Charles Fred PriceThe South lost one of it's quietly beloved voices last week with the passing of Charles F. Price: journalist, teacher, historian, and a writer dedicated to honoring the heritage of his native Western North Carolina. He is best known for his historical fiction, most notably, The Hiwassee Trilogy.

Mr. Price has written about his childhood as the son of a Methodist preacher, an unexpectedly nomadic life as his father went from parish to parish at the behest of his Western North Carolina Conference. The cherished memories of the many communities the family served were strangley at odds with the impermanence and rootlessness of the life.

Perhaps it was no surprise, then, that Price left his native high country as a young man, nor that it took him twenty-five years to return, at last, to write:

"I think we shouldn’t try to understand too well why we write, for the source of art is not corporeal; it is, at last, a mystery. But I know a few things for certain. Coming back to the mountains was a rediscovery of a fact I had come near losing: The mountains are in me. They always have been; they were in me even when I refused to recognize them. They are why I write."