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RECENT RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOUTHERN INDIES (PDF)


RECENT RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOUTHERN INDIES...

I'm Not Dying with You Tonight by Gilly Segal, Kimberly JonesOne of the best YAs I've read in years! I'm Not Dying with You Tonight is the story of two strong women who are polar opposites joining together to survive a night of racially fueled chaos. It's so well written and perfectly-rounded. It sucks you in from the first page and leaves you wondering what's next when you finish. This was a joy to read.

I'm Not Dying with You Tonight by Gilly Segal, Kimberly Jones ($17.99*, Sourcebooks Fire), recommended by Copperfish Books, Punta Gorda, FL.

The Year They Fell by David KreizmanThe Year They Fell recounts the lives of Josie, Jack, Archie, Harrison, and Dayana. They went through childhood together as the Sunnies, but eventually became more self-contained and broken after everybody's parents (except for Dayana's) die on the same plane crash. Life is forever changed and they all need time to heal. However, Harrison refuses to accept the validity of the plane crash, and convinces his friends to travel to the site of the crash to find how and why their parents died. Kreizman is such a powerful writer; the perspectives of the five main characters each feel so alive and authentic. So many events are packed into such a hefty plot that will surely leave you breathless in the end. I recommend this book to anyone going through a loss, or some other grief, because they are guaranteed to relate to one of the Sunnies and maybe even leave their tear stains on the pages.

The Year They Fell by David Kreizman ($17.99*, Imprint), recommended by Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill, NC.

Someone We Know by Shari LapenaI would read Shari Lapena's grocery list, y'all. She's so skilled at the twisty mystery and this new book is as good as her others. When suburban mom Olivia finds out that her teenage son has been breaking in to the homes of their neighbors, she is terrified that he'll be in serious legal trouble despite his assurances that he never steals, only snoops. When a pretty young wife - who happens to live in one of the houses he broke into - turns up dead, no one is free of suspicion. As we dive deeper into the private lives of the neighbors, we learn that everyone is hiding something, and anyone could have done it.

Someone We Know by Shari Lapena ($27.00*, Pamela Dorman Books), recommended by Fountain Books, Richmond, VA.

Smokescreen by Iris JohansenIt is amazing to me that Iris Johansen can keep the Eve Duncan series current, relevances and engaging this long, but she does in a compelling fashion. This is one of my favorites in quite some time, the supporting characters are so deep, and single minded in a quest for justice, that you immediately become invested. Journalists who are bold see the worst the world has to offer, corruption at the highest level, brutality for no reason, and the accumulation of wealth at the expense of the poor. This story embodies all of the above with enough twists to keep you entertained to the end. Can easily be read as a stand alone book.

Smokescreen by Iris Johansen ($28.00*, Grand Central Publishing), recommended by Fiction Addiction, Greenville, SC.

Semicolon by Cecilia WatsonAn interesting take and an in depth look at the punctuation mark that haunts the literary and English speaking world alike. Cecilia Watson has brought us a book designated to those of us who just can't quite figure out how we feel about the semicolon.

Semicolon by Cecilia Watson ($19.99*, Ecco), recommended by Bookmarks, Bookmarks, NC.

Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn JacksonWarning: This plot just might give you whiplash. Not to say that Jackson is ever predictable, but this is a whole 'nother level of WTF. Intelligently written and delightfully witty, it begins as a top-shelf suburban thriller, but then kicks up a notch. Protagonist Amy is likable and smart, but keeping a terrible secret or three. Our anti-heroine, Roux, is a real piece of work, and you can really understand Amy's strange attraction to her. I wasn't sure whether I wanted Amy to beat her or to BE her...until the end, when it becomes crystal clear. Along the way, we are treated to some lovely writing in praise of SCUBA diving, early motherhood, a genuine friendship, a reckless neighbor, and a deep, dark secret that threatens to upend Amy's happy world. And all the trouble begins with a boozy book club. It's just delicious reading.

Never Have I Ever by Joshilyn Jackson ($26.99*, William Morrow), recommended by Sunrise Books, High Point, NC.

 A Summer 2019 Okra Pick

Midnight at the Blackbird Cafe by Heather WebberAs a North Alabama resident, I was delighted to learn about this new novel set right here at home. Wicklow, Alabama, is a little town that has a made-up name but feels oh-so-familiar. The southern food, characters, and community all drew me right in, and I fell in love with this charming story about a young woman who comes to Wicklow to take over her Granny Zee's café upon her death. Like Anna Kate, many of the charcters in this little town are struggling with grief of one kind or another, and yet this book isn't sad. It shows the wonderful way that a close-knit community can come together to lift each other up. The novel blends magical realism with true southern storytelling, and I can't wait to share this book with readers near and far. Sit down with some blackberry tea and a piece of pie, and let this novel feed your soul.

Midnight at the Blackbird Café by Heather Webber ($24.99*, Forge Books), recommended by The Snail on the Wall, Huntsville, AL.