GREAT READS HANDPICKED BY GREAT SOUTHERN BOOKSELLERS...

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  • And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer (A Novella) by Fredrik Backman

    Fredrik Backman’s latest book is small yet carries a lot of weight. The story of a grandson and son dealing with a grandfather’s dementia. Every word cuts right to the heart. Sincerely moving and endearing. A book all should read!

    And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer (A Novella) by Fredrik Backman ($18, Atria Books), recommended by Melanie, Litchfield Books, Pawleys Island, SC.

  • Atlas Obscura: An Explorer’s Guide to the World’s Hidden Wonders by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton

    This isn’t a $35 travel book so much as the best, cheapest coffee table book you could ever buy. A gorgeous encyclopedia of the coolest sights on the planet. It is so large, and so thorough, that there literally is something in it for everyone. Atlas Obscura: An Explorer’s Guide to the World’s Hidden Wonders by Joshua Foer, Dylan Thuras, Ella Morton (Workman Publishing, $35.00), recommended by Tristan at Parnassus Books, Nashville, TN.

  • Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott

    I read this my first year of college when I was still trying to decide if I wanted to write.

    Chapter 3 is titled SHITTY FIRST DRAFTS.

    It's full of good advice and encouragement for the beginning writer and would make a great gift. It's less an instruction book than a series of stories focused on the process. It's informal and funny and I was better for it.

    Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott (Anchor) Recommended by Dottie at Square Books Oxford MS 

  • Man Walks Into a Pub: A Sociable History of Beer by Pete Brown

    Man Walks Into a Pub: A Sociable History of Beer by Pete BrownIn this Bill Bryson-esque history of pub culture and drinking in England, author Pete Brown carbonates the proceedings with just the right amount of humor and trivia (from "taking you down a peg" to Crocodile Dundee) to make it all go down smoothly.

    Man Walks Into a Pub: A Sociable History of Beer by Pete Brown ($15.95, Pan Books), recommended by Steve, Fountain Books, Richmond, VA.

  • My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop by Ronald Rice (Editor)

    My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop by Ronald Rice (Editor)The independent bookstore relationship is a must read for those who must write or wish to. 84 authors share their inspirations and experiences with their favorite local haunts. This would make a great gift for both the book lover and the bookstore lover! Plus...the book jacket is very cool, a great addition in a personal library.

    My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read, and Shop by Ronald Rice/editor ($23.95, Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers), recommended by Dori, Page 158 Books, Wake Forest, NC.

  • Radical Candor by Kim Scott

    Radical Candor/Kim Scott Radical Candor is the best book on being a boss (i.e., managing people) that I've ever read. Kim's system is elegantly simple, eminently useful, and applicable to anyone who has ever been an employee or an employer. Unlike the dry tone of most business books, Kim sounds like an older sister sharing hard-won experiences and her gossipy Silicon Valley examples also make the book a fun peek into the tech companies like Google and Apple that are now mainstays of the Fortune 500.

    Radical Candor by Kim Scott ($26.99, St. Martin's Press), recommended by Jill, Fiction Addiction, Greenville, SC.

  • Rude Bitches Make Me Tired by Celia Rivenbark


    Celia Rivenbark is the bestselling author of We're Just Like You, Only Prettier, and now writes a mildly profane etiquette manual for the modern age.

    She addresses real life quandaries ranging from how to deal with braggy playground moms to correctly grieving the dearly departed. Good Manners have never been so wickedly funny!

    Rude Bitches Make Me Tired by Celia Rivenbark (St. Martin's Griffin), recommended by The Country Bookshop Southern Pines NC.

  • Taxidermy Art by Robert Marbury

    Ok, so taxidermy seems creepy, but this book is just wonderful.Not only does it showcase truly talented artists, there is also a brief history of taxidermy and its major players throughout history.

    TAXIDERMY ART doesn't stop there. There is a wonderful guide to getting started on taxidermy in the back. Art, history, and DIY all in one book.

    Taxidermy Art: A Rogue's Guide to the Work, the Culture, and How to Do It Yourself by Robert Marbury (Artisan Publishers) Recommended by Al at Square Books Oxford MS

     

  • The Letters of John F. Kennedy by John F. Kennedy, Martin W. Sandler (editor)


    This collection is the first to present significant conversations in their entirety between JFK and his correspondents, including historical giants like Eleanor Roosevelt, Martin Luther King, Jr., Harry Truman and Nikita Khruschev as well as his school friends, Navy comrades and everyday Americans.

    The book includes images from his presidential library and facsimiles of many letters!

    The Letter of John F. Kennedy by John F. Kennedy, Martin W. Sandler (editor) ($30.00, Bloomsbury Publishing), recommended by Kimberly, The Country Bookshop, Southern Pines NC.

  • The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo

    “The question of what you want to own is actually a question of how you want to live your life!” Kondo exclaims. While I am still working my way at decluttering my space, following the advice of this book has been fairly straight forward. The concept is pretty simple: get rid of physical baggage so you can focus on living your life (and maybe cutting some other types of baggage too). It’s empowering, it’s not being beholden to material possessions, it’s learning how to make your space serve you, and it’s deciding what you want for your life as the person you are today. Now that is life-changing.

    The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo (Ten Speed $16.99), recommended by Ceewin, Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh, NC.

  • The Sense of Style by Steven Pinker

    Steven Pinker has been a favorite of mine for a long time.

    How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, The Better Angels of Our Nature have hugely influenced my thinking about consciousness, human behavior, and ethical issues. One of his greatest strengths as a writer is his ability to untangle difficult topics and clearly present them to the reader.

    Here, he offers common sense advice to writers who want to improve their writing.

    The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century by Steven Pinker (Penguin Books) Recommended by Brian at Malaprops Bookstore Asheville NC

  • Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss

    This isn't a self-help or get rich quick book; it's the ultimate browsable treasure trove of tidbits of information from the lives of individuals who are masters of their craft. Topics range from fitness & diet to friendships, work habits, tech, and everything in between. Who doesn't want to hear some sage advice from people like Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sebastian Junger, Jamie Foxx, or Sam Harris? Just the info on pg. 138 about evening and morning rituals is well worth the price of admission (and truly changed my life for the better). If you take from this book what the author intends, you'll "like 50%, love 25%, and never forget 10%."

    Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss ($28, Houghton Mifflin), recommended by Lane, Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill, NC.

  • Wait, What? And Life's Other Essential Questions by James E. Ryan

    Wait, What? And Life's Other Essential Questions  by James E. RyanI am generally dismissive of these expanded commencement addresses that clog the shelves every graduation season, but I can't seem to get this one out of my mind. Despite the lofty title of Dean of the College of Education at Harvard, Ryan's contribution to the genre is plain-spoken, funny, honest, and honestly helpful. He focuses on asking yourself a series of broad questions regularly to enhance your character, your quality of life, and your contribution to the world. You can read it in about two hours. This book is great for anyone in transition: moving, retiring, starting a new job. I highly recommend it. I can't stop thinking about it.

    Wait, What? And Life's Other Essential Questions by James E. Ryan ($19.99, HarperOne), recommended by Fountain Books, Richmond, VA.

  • Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky

    A recent U.S. Department of Education survey found that high school girls take the same number of math and science classes as boys and earn slightly higher grades, but only 15 percent of U.S. collegiate women major in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

    Encouraging young women and girls to pursue STEM career tracks has never been more important. Women in Science highlights notable women's contributions to various scientific fields. A fascinating collection full of striking, singular art, the book features 50 profiles and illustrated portraits of women in STEM from the ancient to the modern world, and also contains infographics about interesting and relevant topics such as lab equipment and rates of women currently working in STEM fields.

    Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky (Ten Speed Press) Recommended by Bookstore1Sarasota Sarasota FL